For the 16th time, the Teledyne CARIS International User Group Conference brought together an unmatched roster of experts, speakers, and in-depth technical papers. We would like to extend a most sincere Thank You to all attendees, speakers, exhibitors for your contributions to the overall success of CARIS 2017.

We hope that through our conference, you were able to take away new ideas and concepts that will help you in your role. We are very honoured that you took the time to attend, share your ideas and knowledge, and help us shape the future of CARIS software.

Each of the conference session presentations have been posted for you to view, along with a photo gallery of the week in Ottawa.

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Ocean Surveying – Where to Begin and With What Technology?

Gordon Johnston, BSc (Hons), MRICS, FRIN, FHydSoc
Venture Geomatics Ltd.

Over recent years there has been a growing awareness by the public that our oceans and seas have not been fully surveyed. IMO SOLAS chapter V regulations require maritime states to maintain a hydrographic service capability. This has traditionally been focused on the relative shallow waters of the coasts, the continental shelf and key shipping routes and has meant that the vast majority of our international waters and oceans have remained un-explored and are yet to be systematically surveyed to a reasonable degree of accuracy, resolution and coverage. Things just might finally be changing. In late 2014 a tripartite group of the European Union, Canada and the USA signed the "Galway Statement" that aimed to increase cooperation in relation to the Atlantic, research aimed at sustained benefits. A Working Group was formed to develop a plan to increase the areas that are systematically surveyed and to use the existing vessels and media outlets to increase peoples' awareness and appreciation of the North Atlantic. Initiatives to use research vessels, that are already in the Northern Atlantic, to collect data have started and the WG has undertaken work to identify prime candidate areas for pilot survey projects. The North Atlantic has deep water, remote locations and a harsh environment. All represent a challenge that equates to a high cost. A prime area of focus therefore has to be the reduction in cost, automation of collection and processing and its distribution to the widest group of stakeholders possible. This presentation provides a short perspective on Atlantic Mapping Initiative. It also attempts to offer some insight to possible new technologies and developments that could impact on the oceans being surveyed.

This year the Flemish Hydrography has started with the Meta Data Harmonization recommended by the INSPIRE Directive. Together with Teledyne CARIS, the Flemish Hydrography has created new INSPIRE View Services in SFE Server 6.0, Runtime 15.0.1, SFE Viewer 5.9.3 with BDB 4.2, and has harmonized the layer names based on the INSPIRE themes: Administrative Units, Geographical Names, Area management /restriction/regulation zones & reporting units, Protected Sites, Elevation, and Sea regions. In a second phase, the currently developed Custom Web Application will be expanded with extra features.

Using CARIS Onboard to Maximize Data Acquisition in the Field

Alison Pettafor
Centre for Environment Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS)

CARIS Onboard was originally designed for processing AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle) data. However during a recent survey trialing the software, it was utilized to create surface images for multiple purposes in real-time in the field. Small vessel surveys don't always have the luxury of both surveyors and processors, CARIS Onboard was set-up on an acquisition laptop on a small survey vessel, initially to produce a processed data image that could be sent back to the office as a progress update. This was then expanded to include reviewing surfaces during survey and using the data to create infills and re-run lines in real time. As well as this, when the weather was getting rougher, the data would show a quick update to demonstrate when it no longer reached specifications. The data was processed in the background on the laptop and after each finished process (checked on the CARIS Onboard live screen), was refreshed in either HIPS and SIPS or Easyview to check the quality and any gaps that were remaining. This procedure saved on cost of personnel, time and any delay to the data acquisition and therefore maximized the time constraints to complete the survey. The small files were able to be sent via email from a remote location and removed any requirement for evening processing or a reduced survey day. The benefit of having CARIS Onboard over the batch processor/process designer on the small boat work, is that it allowed the surveyor to concentrate on quality data collection, whilst having the freedom to access all processed data in the field.

Improved Operational Decision-Making for USV Fleet Surveys

Michael Redmayne
Teledyne CARIS

CARIS Onboard was originally designed for processing AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle) data. However during a recent survey trialing the software, it was utilized to create surface images for multiple purposes in real-time in the field. Small vessel surveys don't always have the luxury of both surveyors and processors, CARIS Onboard was set-up on an acquisition laptop on a small survey vessel, initially to produce a processed data image that could be sent back to the office as a progress update. This was then expanded to include reviewing surfaces during survey and using the data to create infills and re-run lines in real time. As well as this, when the weather was getting rougher, the data would show a quick update to demonstrate when it no longer reached specifications. The data was processed in the background on the laptop and after each finished process (checked on the CARIS Onboard live screen), was refreshed in either HIPS and SIPS or Easyview to check the quality and any gaps that were remaining. This procedure saved on cost of personnel, time and any delay to the data acquisition and therefore maximized the time constraints to complete the survey. The small files were able to be sent via email from a remote location and removed any requirement for evening processing or a reduced survey day. The benefit of having CARIS Onboard over the batch processor/process designer on the small boat work, is that it allowed the surveyor to concentrate on quality data collection, whilst having the freedom to access all processed data in the field.

OGC's Marine Domain Working Group; Updates and a Proposed MSDI Initiative

Trevor Taylor
OGC, Asia and the Americas

Geospatial data in the marine domain has been successfully standardized for navigational purposes by hydrographic agencies for many years. The core data that support this activity is now in demand for a much wider range of applications (e.g., environmental protection, emergency response, offshore energy, and fisheries, Arctic information management) and as such interoperability of this data is more important than ever before. Increased volumes of data and new data collectors are promising sources that may lead to improved information, but it is critical that the data collected can be used effectively and in a standardized way by a much wider group of stakeholders to support a Blue Economy.

The OGC Marine Domain Working Group was established to address the gap in the OGC baseline with regards to marine geospatial data and to ensure knowledge is exchanged effectively between the relevant standards organizations, the OGC membership, and the broader geospatial community.

This talk will provide an update on the activities of the Marine DWG, cooperation, and collaboration with IHO and other standards developments organizations and present a proposal for a Marine SDI initiative intended to assist the global community in defining a baseline framework for MSDI

Coastal and Marine Spatial Data Infrastructure in Flanders, Belgium

Marc Roesbeke
Flemish Government – Agency for Maritime and Coastal Services, Coastal Division – Flemish Hydrography

The Flemish Hydrography, part of the Flemish Government in Belgium, has implemented a Coastal and Marine Spatial Data Infrastructure (MSDI) for the Belgian coast, the canal Ghent-Terneuzen, and the River Scheldt. The future policy of the Flemish Government is to promote and distribute Open Data for the benefit of various European projects.

Building on the success of the on-going "EMODnet - Coastal Mapping" and "EMODnet - Bathymetry" projects, the European countries established, on behalf of the European Commission, a joint consortium, "EMODnet High Resolution Seabed Mapping (HRSM)", consisting of 29 partners and 12 subcontractors. Our strategy is to take advantage of the best bathymetric data, and to add our proven expertise in data processing, data fusion, and bathymetric know-how along with technology innovations to help us better manage and process the huge amount of data sets. For the coastal dimension, the results of the EMODnet Coastal Mapping project, together with the previous EMODnet Bathymetry project, were used to update the bathymetric EMODnet portal http://www.emodnet-bathymetry.eu with HRSM data sets. The French Hydrographic Service SHOM is the EMODnet HRSM coordinator, and the private company MARIS from The Netherlands is the Deputy coordinator.

This year the Flemish Hydrography has started with the Meta Data Harmonization recommended by the INSPIRE Directive. Together with Teledyne CARIS, the Flemish Hydrography has created new INSPIRE View Services in SFE Server 6.0, Runtime 15.0.1, SFE Viewer 5.9.3 with BDB 4.2, and has harmonized the layer names based on the INSPIRE themes: Administrative Units, Geographical Names, Area management /restriction/regulation zones & reporting units, Protected Sites, Elevation, and Sea regions. In a second phase, the currently developed Custom Web Application will be expanded with extra features.

Data Dissemination and Interpretation at the British Geological Survey

Rhys Cooper
British Geological Survey

The British Geological Survey (BGS) is recognized as a national and international leader in characterizing the geological nature of the seabed and shallow sub-seabed, from developing novel methodologies, to research and applied science. The BGS is the geology, geophysics and backscatter Data Archive Centre (DAC) for the United Kingdom and stores seabed and sub-seabed geological and geophysical data covering the UK Continental Shelf (UKCS) area. Various types of marine geoscientific data are held by BGS, including both data acquired during marine surveys, and derivative data resulting from the processing and interpretation of survey data. This talk will look at how BGS has developed a web delivery service for disseminating this data (including backscatter), under Open Government License (OGL), via the BGS Offshore GeoIndex. These web services and map outputs directly feed into a number of EU led directives, such as the European Geological Data Infrastructure (EGDI) and the various themes of EMODNet. The last decade has seen a significant growth in the availability of multibeam data. Open Government Licenses (OGL) and various data sharing agreements have facilitated far greater access to high quality data, enabling the BGS to create higher resolution geological and environmental maps, in turn driving the development of new, more robust mapping techniques. This talk will also discuss how the BGS combine multibeam bathymetry, backscatter and samples with expert knowledge to create high-resolution maps.

Canada's Marine Spatial Data Infrastructure (MSDI) Development

Claude Guay
Fisheries and Oceans Canada

DFO Sciences Canadian Hydrographic Service (CHS) has contributed to a survey of the status of various MSDI development around the world. The survey was adopted by the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) and forwarded through a circular letter to all IHO member states. The survey focused on the level of development of MSDI's, best practices and lessons learned. The Canadian Hydrographic Service realized in the last few years a feasibility study of a Canadian Marine Spatial Data Infrastructure (MSDI) in Canada. This has led to the development of a prototype Canadian MSDI based on the best practices and lessons learned from the two studies. This was done in collaboration with various federal departments to illustrate the diversity and breadth of data available for an MSDI and its potential uses by the government and the general public. We primarily focused on three pilot areas of interests of around 100 km square: One area east (the Bay of Fundy), one area west (the Dickson Entrance) and one in the Arctic (the Beaufort Sea).

Using Cartography in Source to Produce ENC, Nautical Charts, Small Craft Charts and Raster Tiles

Kennet Swahn
Swedish Maritime Administration

In October 2016, after finishing a 12 month implementation project together with Teledyne CARIS, SMA deployed CARIS HPD to produce ENC's, nautical charts, small craft charts and raster tile products. The 579 Swedish ENC's were migrated into HPD in just two hours and after two weeks of preparations and quality control, the ENC production was switched over to HPD. For SMA's large number of cartographic products, SMA was going to use cartography in source - a new functionality that was provided with HPD 3.2. A cartography migration project has started where cartography is compiled into source usages using a combination of automatic migration tools and manual compilation from backdrops. SMA will use the cartographic source usages to produce not only ENC's and paper charts but also raster tile products and a large portfolio of small craft charts. Cartography will be updated daily by the same cartographer that compiles source data needed for ENC's. Cartography in source enables production of raster tile products with same coverage as the cartographic usages and INT1 presentation or any other presentation available in HPD. It is essential for SMA to keep producing multiple cartographic products from usages that the cartographer only needs to update once. With cartography in source, SMA will also be able to swiftly create new or extend existing small craft charts in areas where cartography has been compiled for nautical charts.

30 years of Data Centric Management at SHOM: What's New with BDB and HPD

Denis Creach
Service Hydrographique et Océanographique de la Marine (SHOM)

This paper focuses on the data centric organization SHOM has been managing for decades. BDB-HPD is a boosting step as a challenging and hopeful one. It elaborates on the accomplishments still in process, some challenges, ways to mitigate them and some way forward to make the SHOM vision a reality. In the initial years of ENC production, the process relied on the charts supplemented with a real world database to be tightly bound with later on. Eventually with HPD, we have been able to turn around the workflow. ENCs are now produced and maintained straight forward from the cartographic sources affiliated to the real world sources as managed in HPD/SE. Paper charts are then designed from HPD/SE to HPD/PCE, taking advantage of automatic customized processes to discharge the cartographer to systematic low value tasks. Consequently (s)he is free to focus on the best way to highlight the relevant information to the end-users. Coming soon is the production of the chart notices using Publication Module in a row of PCE which bears hope to reduce time to populate new critical information to the end-users.

We are also moving forward to centrally managing information in HPD/SE to produce lights, radio signals and sailing directions publications with contribution of HPD/PE. In this way a real world source feature will be managed once on a nautical prospective and use in all the relevant products required. Efficiency is one trigger, e-navigation another one. We are also considering how to support the generalization of the bathymetry with BDB and HPD/SE to reduce the time to integrate new surveys in the ENCs and charts.

Hydrographic Data Management (HDM) for General Commission of Survey, KSA

Dr. Ganiga Thippeswamy Vijaya Kamar
IIC Technologies, Inc.

GCS has a number of broad objectives which resulted in full Hydrographic Data Management (HDM) capabilities meeting the governmental requirements of a national hydrography service and to administer a wide variety of oceanographic and marine sciences data similar to those supported by the most advanced hydrographic offices (HO) around the world.

    IIC has executed the HDM project in three phases:
  1. Development and Installation
  2. Operational Set-up and Optimization
  3. Final Implementation

The core production systems of CARIS BDB & HPD deployed and customized fully to establish operational capability following well-designed standard operational procedures for managing data in a centric database and produce navigational products. The HDM project enable GCS that can provide the services set out by SOLAS while also supporting oceanographic and marine science requirements.

GCS HDM team now have the requisite production knowledge, trained capacity and capability, using the best available database-driven technology and most effective workflow processes, supported by a robust quality management system through a workflow management system.

LINZ New Zealand Hydrography Risk Assessment

Kristian Jones
Land Information New Zealand

Land Information New Zealand (LINZ), the New Zealand Hydrographic Authority (NZHA), has undertaken an evidenced based risk assessment of maritime traffic within New Zealand waters to identify areas of risk. The risk assessment was based on the novel methodology developed during the South-West Pacific Regional Hydrography Programm (SWPRHP) with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs & Trade (MFAT). The methodology used a GIS based risk model of 39 layers with a level of risk assigned to each cell within the layer. The cell resolution varied from ports & harbours, to the Territorial Sea limit, to the EEZ, with greater granularity in the ports & harbours where vessel movement becomes more critical. The layers included environmental, cultural and economic factors, as well as chart quality information and seabed characteristics. The GIS was used to analyze each layer against actual vessel track information taken from vessel Automatic Identification System (AIS) data along with other geospatial data sets to produce a simple heat map based on comparative risk level. The risk criteria, used to build the model, were developed to reflect the NZ maritime environment in terms of traffic profile as well as environmental, cultural and economic consequences, which are considerably different to those represented in the SWPRHP risk model. The result has enabled LINZ and key stakeholders, notably Maritime New Zealand the national maritime regulator, to prioritize a long term survey and chart improvement program. This in turn has enabled LINZ to actively seek opportunities to collaborate with partners to collect additional datasets for use by the wider scientific community, for example, habitat mapping and improving our understanding of our marine estate. This presentation will describe the process, present some of the findings and an example of collaboration.

Applying Satellite Derived Bathymetry: Advantages and Limitations

Chris Howlett
TCarta Marine

The research behind satellite derived bathymetry has existed for almost 40 years. However, it is only relatively recently with the launch of very high resolution, multi-spectral satellites that this research has become commercially viable. TCarta Marine have been at the forefront of developing satellite derived bathymetry as a product and gaining acceptance within the market place, completing over 30 projects since 2011.

In summer 2016, TCarta Marine (formerly Proteus), embarked on a project to create a global off-the-shelf satellite derived bathymetry data service. Through support from the European Space Agency, and in close partnership with DHI and DigitalGlobe, the world's shallow water zone is being mapped from the dry line to the 20 metre depth contour. The output is a depth point every 2 metres (where conditions allow). As part of this ambitious project, a robust, quality assured work flow has been developed, which includes assigning every depth sounding with a metric vertical uncertainty value.

Satellite derived bathymetry has proven to have many wide-ranging applications including military, environmental, engineering, risk modelling, and oil and gas exploration. Although the ability to acquire shallow water bathymetry remotely has significant advantages, the data does have some limitations. For our end users it is very important to understand what these data limitations are, and to have a clear picture of uncertainty that exists within the data.

This paper will explore some of the advantages and limitations of satellite derived bathymetry. There will be specific focus on explaining the accuracies that are currently achievable, and through demonstration of use cases, showing how the data is being applied in various scenarios.

Small-Object Detection using Coastal Zone Mapping and Imaging Lidar (CZMIL)

Hieu Duong
Teledyne Optech Kiln

The Coastal Zone Mapping and Imaging Lidar (CZMIL) is an airborne mapping system specifically designed by Teledyne Optech, Inc. for use in the USACE National Coastal Mapping Program. We will discuss two separate projects with the objective of detecting and mapping small objects in a marine environment. Teledyne Optech partnered with the Ocean Cleanup team to support their 2016 "Aerial Expedition". Contributing hardware, software and expert consultation, Teledyne Optech worked with the Ocean Cleanup team to create the first-ever aerial survey of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. During the two-day mission, the expedition scanned thousands of square kilometers using CZMIL's suite of image and data collection instruments, including its lidar, RGB camera and ITRES SASI-600 SWIR (Short-Wave Infrared) sensor.

We will present results from the automatic object detection program that was developed to estimate the number of pieces of garbage debris per square kilometer. The International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) criteria state that, in addition to specific positioning requirements, a survey system must be able to detect "cubic features" of specific dimensions. For CZMIL's detectability testing of cubic features, a comprehensive field campaign was conducted by the US Naval Oceanographic Office. Cubes were deployed in specific seafloor locations within a survey area off the coast of Panama City, Florida during October 2015. The results are compared to survey data obtained along with a set of environmental characteristics measured in situ using hand-held instruments. We will present results from the analysis that demonstrate CZMIL's ability to detect the cubic features and confirm the validity of the theoretical prediction of the bottom-feature detection probability and spatial resolution achieved by the system in various environmental conditions.

SHOM Chart Notices using Publications Module

Pierre-Yves Le Moigne
Service Hydrographique et Océanographique de la Marine (SHOM)

SHOM maintains its cartographic usages through HPD Source Editor (SE). Maintenance actions (addition, modification and deletion of nautical information) are propagated into Product Editor (PE) for ER realization and into Paper Chart Editor (PCE) for paper chart maintenance. The workflow of paper charts maintenance finishes with the creation of an up-to-date paper chart product and also with the extraction of correction information that will be dealt as notices to mariners in SHOM Notices to Mariners group (GAN : Groupe d'Avis aux Navigateurs). SHOM is currently using a notices to mariners production software (4D) disconnected from chart redaction. The setup of an operational workflow to produce the IHO and SHOM standards compliant text corresponding to a notice to mariner from a correction of the related chart done in PCE is therefore a major stake in order to reduce time in cartographic maintenance. Thus, the goal of the presentation is to show the different aspects of the implementation of Publications Module in SHOM workflow. This includes also the behavior of PM in manual edition of notices related to paper charts not maintained in HPD. The presentation will tackle with the progress of the automation, the ease in PM configuration access and will highlight ergonomics issues which are a key point for operators. The latest changes coming from HPD 3.2.5 will be tested and should participate in an operational implementation at the end of the first semester.

Automated Generation of Contours for use in Chart Production

James Cooke
UKHO

New and improving technologies are leading to an ever increasing amount of bathymetric data being gathered. This represents a significant challenge but also a huge opportunity for Hydrographic Offices to improve the safety of Navigational Products and Services. This is of even greater significance when considering the increasing requirement for greater density of contours when using Electronic Charts.

Hydrographic Offices must find a more efficient way to process survey data into subsets of contours and soundings for use in onward chart production in both electronic and paper formats.

At present this is a predominantly manual process. UKHO has been using Caris Bathy DataBASE (BDB) to develop a process to as far as possible automate the production of contours, and depth areas which are subsequently "cut" into the existing data already held in CARIS Hydrographic Production Database (HPD).

UKHO has evaluated the performance of the current surface generalization algorithm for a variety of seabed morphologies to ensure the depiction of contours from these generalized surfaces is safe and ensures any manual editing is kept to an absolute minimum.

We have also worked with CARIS to evaluate output from a new version of the surface generalization algorithm that is due for release in version 4.4 of BDB. Our analysis has shown that this enhanced surface generalization algorithm will mean less manual editing is required and ultimately results in a more accurate contour being produced.

This is the first step towards a more automated flow-line and I will also explore some of the issues with the current process and identify areas where we see future automation being possible.

NOAA's Implementation of CARIS Variable Resolution (VR) and Process Designer for the 2017 Field Season: Efficiency and Automation

John Doroba
NOAA

NOAA Hydrographic Systems and Technology Branch (HSTB), NOAA field units, and other branches use CARIS for data processing. CARIS version 10.2 implements long awaited products and processes. Variable resolution gridding, a single surface with multiple resolutions, is a new product that represents a combined effort amongst NOAA, academia, and CARIS. Process Designer is a new tool that allows the user to combine several processes into a single step. Along with new products and processes, CARIS now allows users to access APIs, which provides us the ability to call functions through the API. With this capability, NOAA HSTB can now run CARIS processes through in house software leading to efficiency gains with the development of new tools and automation. NOAA plans to use CARIS products and processes alongside in-house software to strive for large efficiency gains in the 2017 field season.

New S-100 Standards to Enable the Future of Navigation and Maximise the use of Hydrographic and Oceanographic Data

Louis Maltais
CHS

Bathymetry, water levels and surface currents are key datasets for the maritime community. This information exists but it not readily available in formats that are easy to exchange. Canadian Hydrographic Service (CHS) is fully engaged in leading the definition and implementation of the new S-100 standards. Under Canada Ocean Protection Plan, CHS has clear targets to deliver modern data services that respect international standards. These updated services will enhance ship safety in Canada waters.

On top of the navigation aspect, bathymetry, water levels and surface currents will be accessible to the marine community for a wide range of applications. This paper will show some applications that will benefit from the modern dynamic products from CHS as well as reviewing the important steps toward developing standards.

High Resolution 3D Mapping for Current, Turbulence and Sediment Transport

Ian McLeod
Envenio Inc.

Recent advances in low-cost supercomputing technology have made it possible to study the subsurface environment at a high resolution using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. CFD solves the Navier Stokes equations in three dimensions and produces contiguous data fields that extend horizontally over large areas and vertically throughout the water column. Data fields include mean current and heading, hydrodynamic turbulence, and a variety of transported quantities such as temperature, sediment and contaminants. This type of modeling was not previously part of the hydrographer's toolkit because of high compute costs and long solution wait times, leaving experiment as the only viable alternative. Now, CFD provides a powerful augmentation to experimental techniques. It enables analysts to fill in gaps between sparse sample locations and obtain a more complete picture of the flow. In this study, we describe a concept methodology for computing the flow field and an approximation of sediment transport in section of the Saint Lawrence River. The CFD domain extends (approximately) from the Quebec-Levis ferry route downstream to the eastern tip of Ile aux Grues. Bathymetric contour and surface current data was obtained from the Canadian Hydrographic Service. CARIS BASE Editor tools were used to pre-process bathymetric data sets. Envenio constructed a ~10m computational mesh and ran the CFD simulation using its EXN/Aero CFD solver for peak and off-peak flow rates under steady-state conditions. Post-analysis was then performed in CARIS BASE Editor. Results of this study are relevant to managers of seaways and harbours that need to predict the effect on currents and sedimentation as they plan changes to shoreline features and breakwaters.

Use of HIPS and SIPS 10.2 to Process MBES Scanner Data for Shallow Water Surveys

Ted Cain
PWGSC

CCG Aids to Navigation required a survey at Skidegate Narrows on Haida Gwaii for the review of navigational aids. This is a challenging area due to high current flows, large tidal ranges, minimal depths and remote location. Integration of ILRIS and 7125 MBES essential to safely conducting the survey due to the high risk of grounding with associated risks to equipment and crew.

Previous Environmental Remediation surveys (CFB Naden) requiring complete coverage were consistently missing data when utilizing flown LIDAR and MBES bathymetry data until the integration of MBES and vessel mounted scanner systems.

Survey vessel Pacific Echo equipped with Teledyne Reson 7125 MBES (adjustable flat / 30 degree tip mounted transducer in moon-pool) and Teledyne Optech ILRIS 1000 metre range scanner for shallow water surveys to produce bathymetry from sea-floor to tree-line.

Daily processing with CARIS HIPS and SIPS for QC and assurance of safe waters for subsequent day vessel operations.  Use of version 10.2 with multi-resolution surface for improved retention of isolated high spots during CUBE surface creation and filtering.

Use of HIPS and SIPS 10.2 to Process and Analyze MBES Quay Wall Inspection Survey Data

Mathieu Rondeau
CIDCO

    Augmented by the Engineering Analysis Module (EAM) add-on and the Multi Detections option, HIPS and SIPS 10.2 becomes a very efficient tool to support the processing and analysis of bathymetric data acquired in the framework of a quay wall inspection. A Reson Seabat 7125SV2 MBES dataset collected on the CIDCO's artificial test bench infrastructure will be presented to show:
  • The capabilities of the EAM module to model vertical features and to calculate differences between vertical digital terrain models
  • The added value of the Multi Detection option to augment significantly the detail definition of vertical features.

Use of Kongsberg Extra Detections to Support Pipeline Inspection Surveys

Bart-Jan Tijmes
Fugro

A Kongsberg EM2040 dual head MBES was installed on a bracket in the moon pool of the newly built Fugro Pioneer geophysical survey vessel in late 2014. During various high detail pipeline inspections in early 2015, it became clear that the EM2040 had difficulties in detecting large diameter pipeline free spans at water depths beyond ± 35 meters. In these situations, the pipelines were not detected at all. The residual detections suggested they were the actual seabed underneath the pipeline. The unacceptable loss of critical asset information resulted in numerous discussions with various clients questioning the validity of the MBES data collected by the Fugro Pioneer. Fugro worked with Kongsberg to explain this phenomenon, collecting various datasets using a wide variety of acquisition settings without significant improvements.

During the summer of 2015, Kongsberg released a new feature called Extra Detections which was expected to detect the top of pipe when the main detections fail. In October 2015, the new feature performance was tested on two known freespans of a 36 inch pipeline. All data were analyzed by Fugro and Kongsberg. The Extra Detections proved to be a successful backup to restore the top of pipe in at least 95% of the situations where the main detections failed. Remarkable performance was observed from the cross-lines as no main detection failure was observed. Additionally, Kongsberg informed Fugro that the soundings underneath the pipeline are actually projected soundings from the seabed adjacent to the pipeline. This seabed generates a more powerful return within the -10 dB limit than the top of pipeline and therefore overrules the weaker pipeline return. The Extra Detections were used successfully throughout various pipeline inspection campaigns in 2016 and Fugro is looking forward to start processing the Extra Detection data within CARIS during 2017.

Fine-Tuning of Multibeam Signature using HIPS and SIPS

Christian Comtois
Canadian Hydrographic Service (CHS)

CARIS HIPS and SIPS software is a particularly interesting data processing software, by its potential for functions that can be applied in post-processing. Although a multibeam system is very well calibrated, the echosounder will always have a specific signature to its design. This signature is revealed when we analyze a redundancy of information of the system with respect to itself. It creates an imprecision of the system to the external beams and sometimes even to the nadir. The imprecision may be minor, but it is still possible to improve this signature using HIPS and SIPS. The main objectives are to increase the detection aperture angle without loss of quality, as well as better accuracy for engineering and dredging surveys. This presentation will focus on how to determine the signature of a multibeam echosounder and to determine the overall accuracy of the system with a 95% confidence level. It will focus on how to improve the overall accuracy of the system by making corrections to the echosounder signature.

A 3D Coupled and Dynamic MBES Systems TPU estimator

Nicolas Seube
CIDCO

TPU can be estimated by acheiving the statistical analysis of a point geo-referencing model of a MBES system sounding. As point geo-referencing models are complex from the analytical point of view, it is relatively difficult to deteremine an explicit TPU estimator. The TPU estimator we propose includes the coupled effects of all MBES system parameters, IMU source of errors, and GNSS errors. In addition, it takes into account the dynamics of the survey vessel, the local seafloor morphology. The presentation will detail how we can build a TPU estimator, and will show some results for complex MBES systems, such like remotely operated MBES.

New Tools in Automatic MBES System Parameters: MILAC and LAAC

Nicolas Seube
CIDCO

MILAC (Multibeam - IMU Automatic Lactency Calibration) and LAAC (Lever-Arm-Automatic Calibration) are two new methods to determine the IMU to MBES total latency, and the IMU to MBES horizontal lever-arms. LAAC is based on a adjustment method of overlapping data which should be gathered along simple calibration lines. We shall illustrate the performance of LAAC on several MBES systems. MILAC is a rigorous IMU-MBES latency calibration method and is also fully automated. Thanks to its high resolution in latency estimation (2-3 ms) , MILAC is able to detect variations in a MBES data acquisition system. Again, MILAC performances will be demonstrated on a series of MBES systems.

The Latest Advancements in Normalized Backscatter and Compressed Water Column Data

Uni Bull
Teledyne Marine

Abstract unavailable.